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Dr Nayanika Mathur: Paper Tiger

last modified Dec 11, 2015 04:17 PM

Dr Nayanika Mathur - Paper TigerPaper Tiger: Law, Bureaucracy, and the Developmental State in Himalayan India

Dr Nayanika Mathur's recent publication Paper Tiger: Law, Bureaucracy, and the Developmental State in Himalayan India , (Cambridge, 2015) reveals the double-edged effects of the reforms that have been ushered in by the post-liberalization Indian state, particularly the effort to render itself more transparent and accountable. Through a meticulous detailing of everyday bureaucratic life on the Himalayan borderland, Paper Tiger makes an argument for shifting the very frames of thought through which we apprehend the workings of the developmental Indian state.

To read more about Paper Tiger, please see Cambridge University Press.

 

“Bureaucrats are the evil sisters of ethnographers”: Discussing a new anthropology of bureaucracy in The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology

David Graeber, Laura Bear and Nayanika Mathur were recently in conversation at the London School of Economics (LSE) on the anthropology of bureaucracy. They reflected on the connections between their recent publications that propose a new anthropology of bureaucracy (Bear, Navigating Austerity: Currents of debt Along a South Asian River, Stanford 2015; Graeber, The Utopia of Rules: On Technology, Stupidity, and the Secret Joys of Bureaucracy, Melville, 2015; Mathur, Paper Tiger: Law, Bureaucracy, and the Developmental State in Himalayan India, Cambridge, 2015, Bear and Mathur, Remaking the Public Good: A New Anthropology of Bureaucracy, The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology, Spring 2015).
 
It was a wide-ranging discussion that is available to listen to in full online from Berghahn Books or to read a short summary see the Berghahn Books Blog.