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Rosalie Jones-McVey

Rosalie Jones-McVey

Teaching Associate and Affiliated Lecturer


Biography:

I studied undergraduate social anthropology at Sussex University. Before taking up anthropology, I have worked as a problem horse trainer, coach, and equestrian writer, including working closely with 'horse whisperers' and traditional equestrians alike. I became fascinated by the varied ways in which people relate to their horses, and in 2013, my wife Hannah and I travelled extensively to spend time with a range of horsepeople in different cultural contexts. I documented this journey in a book; “Globetrotting: a travelogue exploring horsemanship in far-flung places” (J A Allen, 2014).

 

In 2014, I began my PhD study at Cambridge University.  Myinvestigated British amateur horse riders' endeavours to cultivate a sense of co-operative, embodied connectivity with their horses. I identified riders' adoption of 'epistemological responsibility' to know their horse better, and investigated how experiences of 'real connection' are cultivated and evaluated in connection with 'modern' epistemological concerns. My PhD brought together recent work in the anthropology of ethics, anthrozoology, and science and technology studies. My future research aims are to investigate the ethical and epistemological dimensions of human/animal relations in 'animal assisted therapy' contexts.

Research Interests

Empathy, 'theory of mind' and 'mind reading'; metacognition; human/animal relations; ethics; British anthropology.

Key Publications

Jones McVey, Rosie. 2017. “Responsible Doubt and Embodied Conviction; Infrastructure of British Horse/Human Partnership,” Cambridge Journal of Anthropology35(2).

Loftus, Loni, Kelly Marks, Rosie Jones-McVey, Jose L. Gonzales, and Veronica L. Fowler. 2016. "Monty Roberts’ public demonstrations: preliminary report on the heart rate and heart rate variability of horses undergoing training during live audience events." Animals6(9):55-64.

 

2015. GlobeTrotting: A Travelogue Exploring Horsemanshipin Far-Flung Places. J A Allen.

This book is based on a blog of horse training methods that I wrote while travelling across three continents; the blog received over 10,000 views, and the book has been very well received.